Walking Ypres: Brandhoek

Just astride the road between Poperinghe and Ypres, the hamlet of Brandhoek was a main site for the treatment of wounded soldiers. Here women serving as Army nurses got close to the realities of war, and the war cemeteries here today remind us that not everyone could be saved.

The Brandhoek entry on Chris Baker’s Long, Long Trail website: Western Front – Brandhoek.

RECOMMENDED READING:

PODCAST EXTRAS:

10 Comments on “Walking Ypres: Brandhoek

  1. Paul, have you been to R.E. Cemetery which is nearby? The first death on the 19th Battalion is buried there. Sept 1915. He had juat come over from training at West Sandling Camp at Hythe and was killed with a few weeks. He was English and I found his war records. He lived in Hamilton Ontario where I live and was raised. He lived at a small house that still exists perhaps renting a room. His next of kin was his sister in London UK. I would enjoy visiting his grave and the walk you describe. I just do not know the simplest was to get to the front. Via England or Paris ? Should I rent a car or train bus. I’m retired. Or should I jump on one of the tour buses you do?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Steve – do you mean RE Farm Cemetery? Yes I’ve been there and interesting your connection to it. Best way to visit from overseas is fly in and hire a car. There are local tours but our Leger tours depart U.K. Drop me an email if I can help further.

      Like

  2. Enjoyed as always Paul.
    You often mention WW1 taking over your life – I was listening while working on my mountain bike on Saturday morning and the new cleaner/degreaser I was using smells of pineapple! Took me straight back to you talking about your friend Malcolm!
    Best wishes
    Matt

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Great podcast Paul. A place I have visited on a number of occasions.
    I visit a chap from Halifax, buried in No.3. Sjt Leonard Hardacre MM C Bty 246 Bde RFA. Died 20 May 1918.
    His brother Irvine (also RFA) worked and joined up with my grandfather in Jan 1916, they worked together at the same mill. He died on 14 Oct 1918, buried at DuHallow ADS Cemetery nr Essex Farm.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Excellent podcast, as ever! Good plug for the gunners too. It must have been quite an experience meeting the Chavasse sisters.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: